Health & Safety ruling out natural light

A newspaper article caught my eye recently, as it revealed house builders are making smaller or elongated windows on upper storeys, potentially reducing the amount of natural light, in response to a government health and safety policy introduced last year.

The policy, which requires windows on upper storeys to be a minimum of 1.1m above floor level, was reportedly introduced as a response to global warming – it seems ministers thought that homeowners will want to open their windows more in the future which would increase the risk of falling out of them.

The previous limit was 80cm, so with many new builds said to have lower ceiling heights, the new rules mean windows are having to be reduced in height, or ‘squashed’, to fit. Or if they are fitted lower, then then they cannot be opened or require safety bars.

Are people falling out of windows more these days because they’re too hot? I’m not sure they are…

Either way, I would be interested in hearing from anyone who has had to fit or specify smaller windows on upper storeys of new builds: you can email me on luke@glasstimes.co.uk
Shortage of fitters

Last week, I attended a round table event, hosted by Bohle. A number of topics were discussed, including the ongoing skills crisis and how one company, Go Glass Design, was embracing AI for office based roles.

We will be revealing more on this initiative at a later date, although it will be a lot harder of course for AI to ever replenish the shortfall of window fitters or glass handlers.

Following last week’s newsletter, I received feedback from one installation company owner who explained how it has become ‘nearly impossible’ to find the fitters who can be relied on to do the job ‘properly’.

He went on to say that he would consider closing down his business if his current fitting team was to retire or leave, and that in 20 years, he’s only had ‘two really good guys’ that could fit to a high standard.

In conclusion, he explained that if something isn’t done at classroom level soon, in terms of training the right people and showing young kids they can have a good career in the industry, then many businesses will be doing the same.

Are you an installation business owner in the same situation? Then please feel free to email luke@glasstimes.co.uk